Showing posts with label Friday Chat. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Friday Chat. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Friday Chat: Redefining the Faculty Lounge

This Friday at 10:15AM EST, we'll be holding the weekly Friday Chat on the topic: Redefining the Faculty Lounge.

Virtual communities and PLNs, time in the schedule resourced for webinars and online experimentation, faculty tech-integration mentors, building a social-media-positive community and more.

Join us on Todays' Meet this Friday for good conversation!

Friday, October 09, 2009

Friday Chat: Paperless Student Publications and Media

Happy Paperless Friday!

Today at 10:15AM EST, we'll be discussing paperless student publications and media over at the Friday Chat.

Paperless student newspapers, digital radio podcasts, and live-streamed student broadcasts are the subject of the day. See you there!

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Tomorrow's Friday Chat: Grassroots Mentoring of Social Tech in Schools

Tomorrow, we'll be having a Friday Chat session at 10:15AM EST on Today's Meet.

The topic: Grassroots Mentoring of Social Tech in Schools.

We'll talk about mentoring colleagues in an inviting and nonthreatening way on all of the ways they can integrate social tech into both their daily classroom practice as well as their ongoing personal professional development.

Because social tech isn't about following rules and jumping through hoops; it's about empowerment.

Sunday, September 06, 2009

Return of the Friday Chats

Veteran readers of this blog will remember the Friday Chats.

Well, they're starting again this coming Friday. I haven't checked my teaching schedule to determine a time yet, but I'll let you all know early this week.

For those who haven't participated in a chat, I encourage you to visit and take part in this first discussion of the new academic year. Basically, we choose a topic and have a 45 minute chat about education, ed tech, and pressing problems for teachers and students. Many folks have commented on the great quality of the chats, and I have to say that I learn a ton from the weekly commitment.

The first chat of the year will be on the topic: "What I Did Over Summer Vacation: Personalized Professional Development in the Digital Age".

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Reminder: This Week's Friday Chat Topic -- Professional Development for Educators: What's Social Media Got to Do With It?

The Friday Chat -- 1PM EST -- June 26th
Professional Development for Educators: What's Social Media Got to Do With It?

We'll be talking about the (nearly) 101 ways in which social media provides for more meaningful professional development for teachers and ultimately what that means for our students and the the classroom experience.

The Friday Chat: Hosted by TeachPaperless every Friday at http://todaysmeet.com/teachpaperless

Friday, June 19, 2009

Social Media's Possible Effects on Assessment, College Admissions, Identity, and Critical Thinking

Engaging discussion this afternoon at the Friday Chat. The topic of discussion concerned the ways in which social media will have an effect on assessment. Going back over the transcript of the chat, three things really struck out at me.

The first was how social media could effect college admissions -- and not in the sense of colleges looking for pictures from high school parties, but from the perspective of how a four-year social media portfolio might demonstrate more about the student's academic, intellectual, and creative capacities than a list of scores on exams ever could.

Second, we discussed the connections between authentic assessment and identity. I discussed this in a post yesterday and have had a lot of conversations about it today. I think it's one to give some real thought to, especially as we see the role of social media becoming more ubiquitous in all aspects of life.

Finally, we had an interesting talk about 'Critical Mass' as a teaching and assessment tool. I am fascinated by the possibilities of using Twitterfall and other forms of real-time search to facilitate critical thinking.

Here are clips from the chat:

On social media, assessment, and college admissions:
I agree w/ critical mass assessment. For a bottom-line oriented community, though, pointing toward a corpus of work might create conflicts. as in -- "this isn't quantifiable...how did you come up with these grades?" Sadly, more earnest assessment isn't always easy to explain. Nate at 3:25 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

I think that's changing. I think the final push will be when colleges completely stop accepting AP scores and move to student portfolios. Shelly at 3:26 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

As a result, I think teachers then create assessments that are retrograde b/c those structures are easy to perceive as being authoritative. Nate at 3:27 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

'Authority' is on the way out. Shelly at 3:27 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

I hope it's changing. Unfortunately, secondary schools w/ more clout w/ colleges are perhaps more able to take these kinds of risks. I'll have to ask some of my friends in college counseling how they perceive these types of portfolios. Nate at 3:27 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

The 'clout' issue... I think there may be a subtext there with regard to grade inflation. Shelly at 3:29 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

It'd be great if students could include on their college application a blog that they've curated for four years and shows intell. growth. Nate at 3:29 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Admissions Counselors are savvy. They know what those scores mean. I think admissions wd prefer four-year portfolios. Shelly at 3:30 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

can you expand on what that subtext of grade inflation is? Nate at 3:30 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

And once they put the muscle of scholarship and financial aid money behind it: watch out! Goodnight AP exams. Shelly at 3:30 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

that'd be great. I think the CB tests do emphasize some important intell. skills, but the institution is just out to make $. Nate at 3:31 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

A friend told me a story that when he first came to this country from afar as a teacher, he was giving lot's of low-Bs as his highest grades Shelly at 3:32 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Pandemonium ensued. Shelly at 3:32 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

That's the subtext of grade inflation. Shelly at 3:32 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

yeah, the issue of grade inflation is rampant at my school presently. Demographic fears (e.g. a top 10% policy) has created a ground-swell movement for higher grades across the board believing that will help. Nate at 3:33 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Universities, more than ever before, are international. What do you think is going to happen to US students w/o changes in assessment? Shelly at 3:33 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web


On the connections between authentic assessment and identity:
I also think that social media and blogging is a good way for students to really distinguish themselves and create a clear identity. Nate at 3:35 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

The 'identity of intellect'. Pappas wrote about this yesterday; I did a follow-up. Absolutely vital to student success. Shelly at 3:36 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

beyond assessment, I think social media helps clearly communicate that the teacher is also simultaneously learning from the students. Nate at 3:38 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Students need to be connected to and validate one another; that's a successful society. Can't just be looking for approval from top. Shelly at 3:38 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

and that community-construction helps foster an 'identity of intellect' that you mentioned. Nate at 3:39 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Recognition of teacher learning is a form of good modeling. In seeking information and analyzing info, we model intellect. Shelly at 3:39 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web


Using Twitterfall in assessments to teach critical thinking:
how do you articulate the concept of "critical mass" to students? It seems a rather nebulous idea. Do you outline it on your syllabus? Nate at 3:42 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

We look at it in the 'real-world' and discuss what it means. Twitterfall is hands-down the best example for the kids. And the fun thing about Twitterfall is that it can be anything from the silliness of celebrity to the seriousness of warzone events. Shelly at 3:44 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

interesting idea about using Twitterfall to see meaningful vs. non- or less-meaningful postings, thoughts, etc. Nate at 3:44 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Exactly. All a matter of being able to evaluate good writing and validate or invalidate sources. Shelly at 3:45 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

that's also a great idea for teaching students to read for POV/perspective; how to understand bias and pay attention to the source's origin. Nate at 3:46 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Heck, I can tell you this: teaching bias via Twitterfall makes teaching Caesar and Augustus a piece-of-cake. Shelly at 3:47 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

yes, primary sources are opaque for students w/out contrasting it with contemporary primary sources--the bias, context, etc. students know. Nate at 3:49 PM, 19 Jun 2009 via web

Rescheduled Friday Chat

For folks following this feed live: there was a screw up re: todays's Friday Chat.

I'm the screw up.

Here's the deal: I'm going to try to run a rescheduled session at 3PM EST today. I'll be there, let's see who shows.

The topic will be: How Will Social Media Effect the Future of Assessment?

How will the integration of social media into assessment effect the authority of final exams and high stakes tests as 'authentic' indicators of student understanding and achievement?

The Friday Chat: Hosted by TeachPaperless every Friday at http://todaysmeet.com/teachpaperless

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Friday Chat: How Will Social Media Effect the Future of Assessment?

In my class, blogging is the primary form of assessment. Everything from vocab dictation quizzes to student posts on the ties between history and current events gets thrown up onto the students' blogs.

I originally started doing this as a way to develop portfolio reviews so that the students would have an easy-to-use resource for studying for the exams. Along the way, I discovered that the blogs themselves were a much better indicator of student understanding than the exams.

Now I'm weighing whether the exams are even worth it.

This Week's Friday Chat will be at 1PM EST on June 19th

The topic will be: How Will Social Media Effect the Future of Assessment?

How will the integration of social media into assessment effect the authority of final exams and high stakes tests as 'authentic' indicators of student understanding and achievement?

The Friday Chat: Hosted by TeachPaperless every Friday at http://todaysmeet.com/teachpaperless

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Reminder: This Week's Friday Chat on the Effect of Social Media on the Future of Assessment

Reminder:

This Week's Friday Chat will be at 1PM EST on June 19th

The topic will be: How Will Social Media Effect the Future of Assessment?

Is blogging more effective than the writing of traditional academic essays? Is a Twitter-enhanced collaborative test more authentic than a traditional selected response test? Does the integration of social media into student assessment portend the end of high-stakes testing?

The Friday Chat: Hosted by TeachPaperless every Friday at http://todaysmeet.com/teachpaperless

Friday, June 05, 2009

Reminder: Today's Friday Chat about Digital Plagiarism

Today, Friday June 5th at 1PM EST:
The Friday Chat will be on the topic of Digital Plagiarism

A topic dear to the heart of any classroom teacher: plagiarism -- and methods of both discovery and prevention -- has become a fresh challenge in the Digital Age. Join us for informal discussion on June 5th.

June 5th at 1PM EST
http://todaysmeet.com/TeachPaperless

Friday, May 29, 2009

Wordle of the Friday Chat: Assessment in the Digital Age



Today's discussion at the Friday Chat was invigorating as usual. Thanks to the folks who stopped by. Here's a Wordle of the chat.

It's always interesting to run discussions through Wordle. Makes me think of Merleau-Ponty's observation that we speak and what we say tells us what we think.

Image from www.wordle.net.

Reminder: Today's Friday Chat about Assessment and Grading in the Digital Age

If it's Friday, it must be the day for the Friday Chat!

Today's Topic: Assessment and Grading in the Digital Age

We'll talk blogging as formative assessment, alternatives to traditional tests and essays, online gradebooks, use of social media in assessment and more.

Friday May 29th, 2009
1PM EST
http://todaysmeet.com/TeachPaperless

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Friday Chat: Assessment and Grading in the Digital Age

As has become our custom here at TP, Friday is the day for the Friday Chat!

This week: Assessment and Grading in the Digital Age
We'll talk formative and summative assessment, alternatives to traditional tests and essays, online gradebooks, use of social media in assessment and more.

Friday May 29th, 2009
1PM EST
http://todaysmeet.com/TeachPaperless

Friday, May 22, 2009

Friday Chat: Partial Transcript of 'Listening to Students about Tech'

Interesting Friday Chat today. This is a new tradition here at TP. Each Friday at 1PM EST, I open up a chat at Today's Meet. You are welcome to join in.

This week, the topic was 'Talking to Students About Technology'. We covered everything from the ways in which students perceive the uses of technology to the ways in which blocking student use of technology can actually be harmful.

Here are some highlights. I haven't corrected any spelling, but I have moved a couple of things around to make sense in this post-chat format. The original chat will be archived at Today's Meet for 12 hours if you want to scour the whole thing.

The chat started with a discussion of using Twitter in the Classroom. In my own experience running Twitter-enhanced high school classes for the last month or so, I've seen the students respond in tremendous ways.
I ran a twitter-based review session today for our final exam and the students responded very well. I'll definitely do that more next year. Nate at 1:10 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I've been using Twitter daily in class for about a month. Been using for general back-channel as well as primary assessment. Shelly at 1:10 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Like to hear a little more about the twitter-based review Joanne at 1:11 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I'd say 95% of my students are 100% crazy about using Twitter in class. Skype also for review and collab work. Shelly at 1:11 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Twitter-based review: two styles... 1) students in Latin class parsing verbs can use TW as a 'lifeline' to their peers. 2) Collab assesmnt. Shelly at 1:14 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

In collab, we use Twitter and Twitter Search to facilitate making wikis and online bibliographies. Shelly at 1:15 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I primarily used Twitter today for the students to get feedback on potential essay questions. They posed their question and peers responded Nate at 1:16 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

We used hashtags today to run a feed of each class's discussion. If you're interested they're #WHDP and #WHEP Nate at 1:18 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Nate, good thinking. I've had them do a similar, but they were required to cite sources in the feed. Then we collected the hashtaged sources Shelly at 1:17 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Most of the critiques were very constructive and on point. Hopefully the students saw how they needed to improve/refine their questions. Nate at 1:16 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

One of my colleagues followed along and even interjected a few comments about the students' progress. Nate at 1:18 PM, 22 May 2009 via web


Discussion then turned to the day's topic:
Now, to the purpose of today's chat. What are some things that you've learned from your students about tech? Shelly at 1:19 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

That they're quite receptive to it, are fast learners, and certainly prefer communicating via it than other means. Nate at 1:20 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I had a student yesterday during student interviews who told a funny story about a party where all 30 kids there at one point were texting.. Shelly at 1:20 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

.. kids who weren't. Shelly at 1:20 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Gives a bit of insight into the idea of 'presence' our kids understand. Shelly at 1:20 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Tech in general. They liked Twitter today (and realized its utility), but they also like Edmodo and Wikis. Nate at 1:23 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I think the kids break down tech into three areas: instant communication / grouping; search; and visual/audio. Basically all forms... Shelly at 1:23 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

... fit into those three. Shelly at 1:24 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I think we'd be wise to understand the implications in terms of what they then think is important and worth 'keeping' from classtime. Shelly at 1:24 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I don't remember if you said what Edmodo is. Ann at 1:24 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

It's a self-contained micro-blogging, social network designed specifically for education (e.g. privacy of students) http://www.edmodo.com Nate at 1:24 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Thanks. Ann at 1:25 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

In terms of IM: kids now are perhaps more accepting of collaboration. It's not an 'auxilary' form of learning. It's a way of life. Shelly at 1:25 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

IM itself has become, esp SKYPE, collab conferencing. Shelly at 1:26 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

In terms of search, with Wolfram and Twitter Search -- that is computational organizing and real-time info, we're into new territory. Shelly at 1:26 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I also think its important for students to understand the nuance between acceptable collaboration and plagiarism/copying. Nate at 1:26 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I've actually had less plagiarism the more I have students online. Shelly at 1:27 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

When I started teaching it was a real problem. But now, in the right classroom approach to tech, students are more apt to take ownership. Shelly at 1:28 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Plagiarism becomes lame. Shelly at 1:28 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

And that fits into their views on multimedia Web 2.0. Shelly at 1:28 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Like Pixton, xTranormal... Shelly at 1:28 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

That's a really interesting finding. I think many educators fear that the exact opposite will happen (largely due to underlying technophobia Nate at 1:28 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Web 2.0 is all about 'ownership' and 'customization'. These are kids growing up on MySpace and WoW. They understand the value of identity. Shelly at 1:29 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

They might look like we did back in school, but they are experiencing culture in a fundamentally different way. Shelly at 1:30 PM, 22 May 2009 via web


Conversation turned to the results of students' use of technology.
I had a student tell me a while back that studying for 'vocab quizzes' was impossible until he was introduced to Pixton.com. Shelly at 1:31 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Now he studies by making short comic-book stories using the vocab words. Shelly at 1:32 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

An he trades them with friends and they remix them. Shelly at 1:32 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

In real-time. Shelly at 1:32 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

That's pretty cool. Ann at 1:32 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I have another student who didn't start to bloom until we got his class on Skype. Now he's studying with friends and isn't scared of quizzes Shelly at 1:33 PM, 22 May 2009 via web


As ed tech discussions often go when talking about students and social media, ours turned to blocking and filtering. I think it's really important to understand filtering from the student's point of view and think about what kind of message filtering sends. After all, it's sort of cruel to sit a kid in front of the most powerful tool humanity has ever produced and tell the student how great it is and then not let the student use it.
I got stuck in a techless space this yr. and that's what's making me realize how much I wanted more tech integration into my class... butwait at 1:38 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Starting working with Glogster.com/edu, but was blocked after first week. John at 1:38 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Hmm. We've talked about this before, but what were the reasons you were given for blocks? Shelly at 1:39 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I had a situation when we started using Twitter in class where a student said her mother would be angry if she knew we were using TW... Shelly at 1:39 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Only then to find out mom used Twitter and was hugely supportive. Shelly at 1:40 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

But I think Twitter and social media in general is actually going to quickly become as common (and at times as much a bother) as the phone. Shelly at 1:41 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Comes down to the 'use' of the technology and not the technology itself. Shelly at 1:42 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I had one student, as I've been doing student interviews, who said she was 'shocked' when she found out Twitter was not an 'education' site Shelly at 1:43 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Because the only place she'd used it up to that point was in my classroom for Latin. Shelly at 1:43 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Shelly - Is your school progressive in terms of using technology? John at 1:46 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

John, that's a loaded question isn't it! Ha! Shelly at 1:47 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Let me put it this way: our admin fully supports our use of Twitter and Web 2.0 in a 1:1 setting. Shelly at 1:48 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

That said, let's just say that keeping on top of getting sites 'unblocked' can be work intensive. Shelly at 1:49 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Our tech folks have been very very helpful in unblocking sites. I'm lucky to have them on my side. My biggest problem is just how many... Shelly at 1:54 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

...sites the filtering software automatically blocks. Shelly at 1:54 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

But, it's been a process over the last four or so years. And I really can't complain. Shelly at 1:54 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

I know. For a long time anything categorized as a blog was out of reach. John at 1:55 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Funny... blogging is my primary form of assessment. Without blogs, I wouldn't be able to function. Shelly at 1:56 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Even had one student who swore her college admission was in direct relation to her blogging. Shelly at 1:57 PM, 22 May 2009 via web

Thanks to the participants in the chat and I hope to see more of you each Friday at 1PM EST.

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Friday Chat: Listening to Students about Technology

The Friday Chat (a new tradition here on TeachPaperless) goes live this Friday, May 22nd, at 1PM EST on http://todaysmeet.com/teachpaperless. Make it an end-of-the-week habit to stop by and join in the discussion. The discussions are archived on Today's Meet for 12 hours after the chat closes, and you are welcome to check out those archived editions and share.

This week's topic will be: Listening to Students about Technology.

Here's a link to a short video my students and I made related to their feelings and my observations about working in a paperless classroom. Might be a good starting point for discussion.

See you there!